Education can lift communities out of poverty by helping children create brighter futures for themselves and their families. We fund programmes that address the reasons why children work, improve their access to education and promote their rights.

Fighting child labour

Children often work because their families do not have the money to feed and support them. Since 2000, we’ve given over €80 million to UNICEF and Save the Children to fight the root causes of child labour in India and Pakistan. In Brazil, our partner Forest Trends helps families from the Surui and Yawanawa tribes find sustainable ways to protect their rainforest homelands and improve their incomes.


Better education for all
Our Soft Toys for Education campaign funds programmes run by UNICEF and Save the Children in Africa, Asia and Europe. These improve the quality of free education by developing teachers’ skills and making schools more child-friendly. This means making sure teachers are well-trained and know how to include all children in lessons—girls, boys, children from ethnic minorities and those with special needs.

Studying during emergencies
Through our partners, we help children to keep up their studies during emergencies such as the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone and the 2015 Nepal earthquake. Our donations also help our partners protect children’s rights in the aftermath of emergencies.

Learning in refugee camps
We fund educational programmes for children and young people in refugee camps and surrounding communities. These include an e-learning project to help refugee children study. We are also supporting the world’s first university programme for people living in a refugee camp in Kiziba, Rwanda.

Higher education for women
Our scholarship programme for women at the Asian University for Women in Bangladesh educates its students to become leaders in their communities. This helps break down barriers that restrict opportunities for women and girls.

Share this:Share on FacebookGoogle+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail to someonePrint this page